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    Pediatric Care

    Note: Our Quality data is submitted to different reporting agencies in different ways. Data/information that appear on California Pacific's Quality web pages may be assigned either to individual or combined campuses at California Pacific based on a set of complex rules, such as hospital license numbers and Medicare identification numbers.

    Pediatric Asthma Care

    Asthma is a chronic lung condition that causes problems getting air in and out of the lungs. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and trouble breathing. Appropriate treatment for asthma can reduce the risk of further attacks. National guidelines for treating children with asthma in the hospital recommend using the medications below.

    Pediatric Asthma Care Measurements: Oct-Dec 2011


    • Use of reliever medication for inpatient asthma
      CPMC - Cal/Pac/Dav - 100%
      CPMC - St. Luke's - 100%
      National Average - 100%
      Percentage of children with asthma who are given reliever medication (like albuterol) while they are in the hospital. Relievers are medications that relax the bands of muscle surrounding the airways and are used to quickly make breathing easier.
      National guidelines for treating children with asthma recommend using relievers in the severe phase and gradually cutting down the dosage of medications to provide control of asthma symptoms. Although there are guidelines for medication therapy for children with asthma, there is evidence that these guidelines are not being consistently followed. Using the appropriate medications will lower the risk of severe illness and/or death.

    • Use of systemic corticosteroid medication for inpatient asthma
      CPMC - Cal/Pac/Dav - 100%
      CPMC - St. Luke's - 100%
      National Average - 99%
      Percentage of children with asthma who are given oral or IV steroid medications while they are in the hospital. These medications work in the body as a whole, rather than just on the lungs. They help reduce inflammation and control allergic reactions.
      Oral or IV steroid medications control severe asthma well. That is why they are important for hospital care. Unfortunately, they can cause serious side effects when used long-term. That is why they are mainly used for severe episodes or chronic severe asthma, which cannot be controlled with other medications (like inhaled or oral bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory medications).

    • HMPC (Home Management Plan of Care) document given to patient/caregiver
      CPMC - Cal/Pac/Dav - 82%
      CPMC - St. Luke's - 50%
      National Average - 80%