Main content

    Maternity Care

    Note: Our Quality data is submitted to different reporting agencies in different ways. Data/information that appear on California Pacific's Quality web pages may be assigned either to individual or combined campuses at California Pacific based on a set of complex rules, such as hospital license numbers and Medicare identification numbers.

    Chart 1 of maternity care indicators. Data in table below.

    Chart 2 of maternity care indicators. Data in table below.
    Note: A lower percentage is better.
    Source: Sutter Health First Pregnancy and Delivery (FPAD)

    Maternity Care: Jan-Mar 2011
    IndicatorsCPMC-CaliforniaCPMC-St. Luke's
    Episiotomy Rates In First Births16.3%2.4%
    3rd/4th Degree Laceration After Birth7.3%10.8%
    Five-Minute Apgar Scores Of Less Than Seven00

    Episiotomy Rates In First Births
    What are we measuring?The percentage of first-time moms who undergo an episiotomy during childbirth. This is an incision (cut) made through the perineum and the vaginal wall to help the birth process.
    Why is this important?It was once thought that episiotomy was helpful in the birth process but it is now accepted that routine episiotomy is more harmful than helpful. Therefore, episiotomy is reserved for specific reasons, such as stuck shoulders during birth.



    3rd/4th Degree Laceration After Birth
    What are we measuring?The percentage of 3rd or 4th degree tears of the perineum (the area between a woman's vagina and anus) during delivery. A 3rd degree tear involves the sphincter muscle either partially or completely. A 4th degree tear goes completely through the rectal mucosa and involves several layers of repair.
    Why is this important?During childbirth, the perineum may tear or be cut. Third- and fourth-degree lacerations are the most severe types of tears and generally can occur during difficult deliveries. A low laceration rate is preferred.


    Five-Minute Apgar Scores Of Less Than Seven
    What are we measuring?The rate of newborn babies who received an Apgar score of less than seven when they were evaluated five minutes after birth. The Apgar score is a method of evaluating the physical condition of a newborn baby shortly after delivery. The score is a number determined by checking the heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, skin color and response to stimuli. Each of these signs can receive 0, 1, or 2 points. When the points are added up, the maximum score is 10.
    Why is this important?A baby who scores a 7 or above after birth is generally considered in good health. A score of less than 7 means that additional medical care may be necessary. However, most newborns with initial scores of less than 7 will eventually do just fine.


    Graph of breastfeeding in hospital percentages
    Note: A higher percentage is better.
    Source: California Hospital Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (CHART)
    California Campus Opens new window|St. Luke's Campus Opens new window

    The graph above shows exclusive breastfeeding in hospital percentages for 2008 as follows:

    Exclusive Breastfeeding (In-Hospital) 2009
    IndicatorCPMC-CaliforniaCPMC-St. Luke'sState Average
    Exclusive Breastfeeding (In-Hospital)69.2%85.9%51.9%
    Any Breastfeeding95.9%97.6%89.6%


    What are we measuring?
    The percentage of newborn babies who were breastfed exclusively before leaving the hospital. The mothers of these babies said they wanted to breastfeed at the time of admission and fed their babies only breast milk throughout their hospital stay.

    Why is this important?
    Exclusive breastfeeding while in the hospital provides a number of benefits to the baby and the mother: it establishes effective suckling and feeding behaviors in the baby, it helps in establishing an adequate milk supply so the mother can continue to provide milk for her baby, breast milk provides optimum nutrition for the baby, and more.

    More Information
    - Learn more about the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. Opens new window
    - Read the San Francisco County Report Opens new window on exclusive breastfeeding.


    Graph of Cesarean birth rates
    Note: A lower percentage is better.
    Source: California Hospital Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (CHART)
    California Campus Opens new window | St. Luke's Campus Opens new window

    The graph above shows Cesarean birth rates for 2007 as follows:

    • California campus: 14%
    • St. Luke's campus: 11%
    • State average: 17%
    What are we measuring?
    The percentage of first-time moms who deliver by Cesarean section. Low risk is defined by baby head first, not a multiple gestation, and at term.

    Why is this important?
    Sometimes it is not possible for babies to be born through the mother's vagina. In such cases, a cesarean delivery may be performed. It may be planned in advance when certain conditions are known. In some cases, if problems arise, the decision is made during labor.


    VBAC Routinely Available (2008)

    • California Campus: Yes
    • St. Luke's campus: No
    Note: To perform VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean) safely, a hospital is required to have 24 hours a day/7 days a week in-house coverage of obstetrics, anesthesia and pediatrics. The St. Luke's campus is a low-risk center that does not have that level of coverage so it does not offer VBAC. The California campus is a high volume center with those coverages available.

    Source: California Hospital Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (CHART)
    California Campus Opens new window | St. Luke's Campus Opens new window

    What are we measuring?
    This indicates whether the hospital offers the option for a mother to deliver her baby vaginally after she has had a prior Cesarean section.

    Why is this important?
    Obstetricians have found that a woman who has had one C-section delivery does not necessarily have to deliver all future babies by C-section. This measure is provided to help you understand that a facility does offer vaginal birth after prior C-section.

    Graph of hospital ratings by maternity patients
    Note: A higher percentage is better.
    Source: California Hospital Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (CHART)
    California Campus Opens new window | St. Luke's Campus Opens new window

    The graph above shows hospital ratings by maternity patients as follows:

    • California campus: 70%
    • St. Luke's campus: 68%
    • State average: 69%
    What are we measuring?
    Based on their care during their hospital stay, maternity patients were asked to rate the hospital on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the best care. "Hospital Rating" shows the percentage of patients who scored the hospital as a 9 or 10 after risk adjustment.

    Why is this important?
    Listening to our patients is an important part of high quality health care, and measuring patients' experiences at California Pacific Medical Center helps us identify opportunities for improvement.

    Graph of maternity patients who would recommend the hospital
    Note: A higher percentage is better.
    Source: California Hospital Assessment and Reporting Taskforce (CHART)
    California Campus Opens new window | St. Luke's Campus Opens new window

    The graph above shows the percentage of maternity patients who would recommend the hospital as follows:

    • California campus: 86%
    • St. Luke's campus: 81%
    • State average: 76%
    What are we measuring?
    Maternity patients were asked whether they would recommend this hospital to friends and family.

    Why is this important?
    Listening to our patients is an important part of high quality health care, and measuring patients' experiences at California Pacific Medical Center helps us identify opportunities for improvement.